HAWS Groundbreaking in One Week – April 6th

Humane society is building on a strong foundation for a better future

The Humane Animal Welfare Society (HAWS) of Waukesha County, Inc. will begin their facility expansion and renovation one week from today on Monday, April 6, 2009. A groundbreaking ceremony at 5:00 p.m. will kick-off the construction project.

“We are all very excited to get our project underway,” noted Executive Director Lynn Olenik. “Even in a down economy the animals within our community need our assistance. Properly meeting their needs continues to be our top priority.”

Olenik continued: “Animals at HAWS will benefit from less cross-contamination, improved isolation facilities, and more comfortable housing. A new exercise area for cats and quiet area for smaller or older dogs will also add comfort, and ultimately make for more adoptable pets.”

Expanded education facilities will allow HAWS to reach out to more groups and families – and especially to more children and youth. Redesigned customer service areas will feature separate places for adoptions, animal intakes and outgoing release/reclaim of found pets.

“Our Capital Campaign Committee is still actively fundraising for the needed fixtures and equipment,” added Board President Fred Hilton. “For those interested there are still many naming opportunities in various price ranges. We definitely welcome any and all donations.”

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Wisconsin Humane Society Executive Director Dies at 58

The Wisconsin Humane Society is deeply saddened to announce that Victoria Wellens, the Executive Director of the Wisconsin Humane Society, lost her battle with cancer.

Victoria was an amazing human being and her commitment and dedication to the Wisconsin Humane Society and the animal welfare field was unparalleled. For 15 years, her outstanding leadership transformed the humane society into a beacon of hope for not only homeless animals, but for people like you who strive to make the world a kinder place for animals. She set the highest standards for animal care and was nationally recognized for her valiant efforts and remarkable leadership.

When Victoria came to WHS in 1994, the shelter was literally sinking into the ground and staff members were desperate for better resources. In just five years, thanks to her brilliant efforts, Milwaukee boasted one of the best shelters in the country, a place where animals receive excellent care in a nurturing and loving environment.

Victoria pioneered so many innovative programs. Education was a cornerstone of her vision, ensuring that compassion and respect for animals would endure in future generations. The wildlife department moved out of the dark basement at the old facility and into an illuminated, spacious center that annually treats more than 5,000 wild animals. Victoria ardently fought to end the suffering of dogs in puppy mills and continued to campaign for the welfare of feral cats in our community until her last days. She was determined to expand the same amazing programs and services offered at WHS into Ozaukee County, laying plans for a state-of-the-art facility that will better serve the needs of animals and citizens in Ozaukee County. Armed with the knowledge of her vision for the future, we hope to see these dreams realized in her honor.

“Words cannot express how much we will miss Victoria’s presence, leadership and vision,” said board president Tony Enea. “Her impact on animals’ lives cannot be measured. We are fortunate that she left us with an incredibly strong management team and structure and her legacy will serve as a foundation for the continued growth and outstanding efforts of the Wisconsin Humane Society to save lives.”

Haws Groundbreaking Set for April 6th

The Humane Animal Welfare Society (HAWS) of Waukesha County, Inc. will begin their facility expansion and renovation on Monday, April 6, 2009. A groundbreaking ceremony at 5:00 p.m. will kick-off the construction project forecasted to last 8-10 months.

“We are all very excited to get our project underway,” noted Executive Director Lynn Olenik. “Even in a down economy the animals within our community need our assistance. Properly meeting their needs continues to be our top priority.”

Olenik continued: “Animals at HAWS will benefit from less cross-contamination, improved isolation facilities, and more comfortable housing. A new exercise area for cats and quiet area for smaller or older dogs will also add comfort, and ultimately make for more adoptable pets.”

Expanded education facilities will allow HAWS to reach out to more groups and families – and especially to more children and youth. Redesigned customer service areas will feature separate places for adoptions, animal intakes and outgoing release/reclaim of found pets.

“Our Capital Campaign Committee is still actively fundraising for the needed fixtures and equipment,” added Board President Fred Hilton. “For those interested there are still many naming opportunities in various price ranges. We definitely welcome any donations, which will enable us to continue our important work within our community.”

HAWS, a non-profit organization established in 1965, assists over 6,000 animals each year and welcomes more than 31,000 human visitors to our shelter annually. As an “open admissions” shelter HAWS assures sanctuary for all animals in need, while offering educational programs and services to promote responsible pet ownership and prevent animal abuse. The shelter is located at 701 Northview Road in Waukesha, Wisconsin. For more information call (262) 542-8851 or log onto our website at http://www.hawspets.org.

Families Encouraged to Attend Story Time and Signing Events

Author Meggan Hill and photographer Susan M. Graunke will be visiting area bookstores to promote their new picture book, Nico and Lola. According to Heartland Reviews, Nico and Lola, “…Is a precious book…The text emphasizes the importance of being kind and the many ways that one can choose to be kind. The book reinforces responsibility and thoughtfulness.”

Hill and Graunke are overwhelmed by the feedback they have received for Nico and Lola. “The real fun for us has been visiting with students at schools throughout the country. The book’s message and photographs really seem to strike a chord with children,” said Hill. The author and photographer offer workshops and presentations for students from preschool to 5th grade.

Meet Meggan Hill, Susan M. Graunke and Lola:

10:30am, Apr. 3, 2009, at Crocodile Pie, 866 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville, IL, http://www.crocodilepie.com

7:00pm, Apr.3, 2009, “Late Night with Lola”, at The Magic Tree Bookstore, 141 N Oak Park Ave., Oak Park, IL. Children can wear their pajamas and bring their favorite stuffed dog to this evening event. http://www.magictreebooks.com

11:00am, Apr. 4, 2009, at Andersons Bookshop, 123 W Jefferson Ave., Naperville, IL. http://www.andersonsbookshop.com

The public is invited to attend these free, family friendly events. “This is a great opportunity for families in our community to share a wonderful message and meet a local, professional author and photographer,” said Rose Joseph, The Magic Tree Bookstore.

About Nico and Lola

In this touching children’s book, a boy named Nico must search his heart for ways to be kind while caring for a little dog named Lola. Tender messages are woven into captivating photographs throughout the story, as a boy and a dog together share kindness.

Every child who learns and shares kindness from a pet has the power to make a difference and make our world a little better place. “It’s a big idea coming from just two little beings we hope will resonate in schools, libraries and homes.” A book for readers of all ages, this tale reminds each of us we can always be just a little bit kinder in everything we do. A book to read, share and always carry in your heart.

A Celebration of Pets Extravaganza

Country View Veterinary Service in Oregon, WI is celebrating ten years of service to our farming and pet owning neighbors by hosting “A Celebration of Pets Extravaganza.” It will be on May 9th, 2009 from 9 AM until 3 PM at our clinic on the corner of S. Fish Hatchery Road and Highway CC in Oregon, WI, just minutes south of Madison.

The extravaganza will include K9 agility demonstrations, sheep herding, professional pet portraits, equestrian demonstrations, seminars, tours, a petting zoo, product vendors, 4H food tents, and a stuffed animal triage unit for our youngest visitors to bring their ill or injured friends for repair. Donations will be accepted at the triage unit for our Homeless Pet Fund which provides veterinary care to stray or homeless animals. Any animal lover is welcome to attend this fun event.

Visit our website for more information at www.countryviewvets.com or call us at 608-835-0551.

WI’s Veterinary Medical School Offering New Service

Now, when pet owners need emergency care for their animal, the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine in Madison is an option.

Recently, the school’s Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital began offering 24/7 emergency care for small animals. This complements the 24-hour service that has always been available for large animals.

It’s the first place Kris Applebee, of Fitchburg, Wisconsin, called when the pregnant beagle she was fostering required an emergency cesarean section. Veterinarians at the school’s hospital met Applebee and her beagle, Sophie, at the door, tried inducing labor with oxytocin, and finally had to resort to surgery to deliver two very large male puppies.

Six weeks later, mom and puppies are doing fine, though Applebee is still looking for a permanent home for the mom, whom she rescued.

“It’s better to come up there when it’s something serious because there are more specialists, and you get lab results quicker,” said Bridget Redig, of Rockford, Illinois, whose Rottweiler, Halia, was recently in the emergency room due to vomiting and explosive diarrhea. “I’ve never had a bad experience when I’ve been up there.”

“I’m so glad to know that now I can just go and don’t have to wait for my doctor’s permission,” agreed Mechelle Clark, of Machesney Park, Illinois. Though Mechelle and her husband, Trent, ultimately lost two of their beloved Rottweilers following complications of kidney and heart disease, she said their loss was made much easier by the extraordinary treatment they received.

The UW Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital has offered walk-in emergency services since October 2008. The new service is available to handle emergencies like this difficult delivery, trauma cases, or other crisis, with specialists a phone call away if needed.

Not only does the new service help animal owners, it provides useful training for veterinary medical students. This training is one of the main reasons the school chose to implement the service.

The school’s hospital is located on the west end of the University of Wisconsin campus, at 2015 Linden Drive. No appointment is necessary for emergencies, though advance calls are appreciated at 608-263-7600. Visit www.vetmed.wisc.edu for more information.

UW Veterinary Care to Hold Open House

The University of Wisconsin’s Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital will hold its first open house in over six years on Sunday April 26, 2009 to introduce the public to the many services available through UW Veterinary Care.

The public can peek behind the scenes of the School of Veterinary Medicine’s UW Veterinary Care services from noon until 4:00 pm. Admission is free.

The UW Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital is located at 2015 Linden Drive in Madison, Wis. Free parking is available in Parking Lot 62 on the UW campus. (Click here for a map.)

Based on the theme “Big and Small, We Treat Them All,” participants will learn how animal patients are treated with the same specialty care provided in human medicine. In addition to guided tours of both the large and small animal hospitals, attendees will have access to interactive hospital experiences including CPR demonstrations, pet teeth brushing, and a live echocardiogram of a dog.

Everyone can enjoy listening to a cow’s heart, meeting unusual animals and learning what it takes to get into veterinary medical school. Children are encouraged to bring their favorite stuffed animal for an x-ray of its “heart.” Surgeons will also be available to suture or bandage any stuffed animal “injuries.”

Open 24/7, the hospital accepts emergencies at all times. The clinic is also open for general and specialty care on an appointment basis. The School of Veterinary Medicine’s Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital is a great resource for veterinarians throughout the Midwest to refer cases to the school’s specialists.

The UW Veterinary Care Open House is a chance to view the veterinary hospital’s facilities and learn more about the variety of specialty and general care services that are offered at the hospital. All are welcome.